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The Environmental Integration Initiative

Chapter 4

Cleaner Production Technology Implementation:
Incentives and Barriers
Many manufacturers are eager to explore technology options that would allow them to avoid environmental regulations. Many cleaner production technologies have the potential to decrease a manufacturer's regulatory burden significantly

 

O
his section lists both incentives and barriers for Massachusetts manufacturers investigating the implementation of cleaner production technologies.


A. INCENTIVES

There are numerous incentives for a manufacturer to investigate and adopt cleaner production technologies, including:

  • potential decrease in regulatory burden;
  • significant cost savings due to reduced operating costs and possible elimination of some or all toxic chemicals used;
  • improved rapport with regulators and community or environmental activists, through good publicity for "clean operations"; and
  • types of cost savings that are harder to quantify (e.g., reductions in worker health and safety risks).

Some of these incentives are discussed below.

1. Avoidance of regulation. Many manufacturers are eager to explore technology options that would allow them to avoid environmental regulations. Many cleaner production technologies have the potential to decrease a manufacturer's regulatory burden significantly. In some cases, it may be possible for a manufacturer to eliminate certain permitting, recordkeeping, or reporting requirements, thus saving time and money.

Example: Cleaner production technology changes to the jewelry manufacturing operations of Howard H. Sweet and Son, Inc. of Attleboro, Massachusetts, changed the company's regulatory status from a small quantity generator of hazardous wastes to a very small quantity generator, releasing it from an array of strict controls on waste storage, treatment and transportation. These technology changes eliminated the use of trichloroethylene and Freon and ended the emission of nitric acid, sulfuric acid and cyanide, all toxic compounds that are suspected carcinogens or are associated with other adverse health effects. See Appendix -- for a Case Study of Howard H. Sweet and Son, Inc.1

2

1 Massachusetts Office of Technical Assistance, Toxics Use Reduction Case Study: Howard H. Sweet Eliminates Emissions of Five Chemicals (Case Study No. 36), November 1995.

 

Volume 1 - Chapter 4

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Revised: 05/03/02

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