Pollution Prevention & Remediation

POLLUTION PREVENTION AND BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES
FOR DRY CLEANERS OPERATING IN BROWARD COUNTY

Pollution Prevention and Remediation Programs Division
218 SW 1st Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33301
(954) 519-1260

Forward
Industry Profile
Atmospheric Emissions and Hazardous Wastes Generated in Dry Cleaning Operations
P2-BMP Objectives, Strategies, and Requirements
Broward County Environmental Regulations that Apply to All Dry Cleaners
Self-Audit Checklist
Prohibition

FORWARD

In 1991, the Broward County Department of Natural Resource Protection (DNRP) initiated the development of Pollution Prevention and Best Management Practices (P2-BMP) for businesses operating in Broward County that use hazardous materials and/or generate hazardous wastes. The purpose of the P2-BMP is to foster a working relationship between the regulated community and DNRP as a regulator in achieving regulatory compliance and in preventing pollution in Broward County. The P2-BMP is intended to serve as a compliance tool enabling the protection, preservation, and maintenance of Broward County's environmental resources.

The overall goal of this document is to facilitate compliance with applicable federal, state and local environmental regulations, minimize wastes, and foster a pollution prevention attitude within dry cleaning facilities operating in Broward County.

Using grants from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Florida's Small Business Assistance Program (SBAP) has already published the Complete Multi-Media Environmental Compliance Assistance Guide for Dry Cleaning Industry. This guide was developed based on Federal and State of Florida requirements effective in 1994 and early 1995.

The DNRP, as a local environmental agency, has developed this P2-BMP document to summarize the local environmental requirements applicable to all dry cleaning facilities operating in Broward County. It has been attached to Florida's SBAP Complete Multi-Media Environmental Compliance Assistance Guide. Broward's P2-BMP has been printed on colored paper to distinguish Broward County's local requirements from Florida's SBAP Complete Multi-Media Environmental Compliance Assistance Guide. This dual document is intended to eliminate confusion for dry cleaning facilities in Broward County concerning the regulatory requirements.

The DNRP's Pollution Prevention Program is committed to assisting dry cleaning facilities within Broward County in achieving compliance with complex federal, state and local environmental requirements. To accomplish this goal, DNRP has developed this document and will distribute it county-wide. DNRP also provides technical support in workshops and non-regulatory on-site visits, upon request.

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INDUSTRY PROFILE

The dry cleaning industry is a service industry involved in the cleaning of apparel, textile industrial goods, and other fabric items. The industry is divided into three sectors, that include:

The commercial (retail) dry cleaning sector is by far the largest, and includes small neighborhood plants operating on an independent or franchised basis. Typical equipment has a capacity of 30 to 60 pounds;

The industrial sector includes those large dry cleaning plants that service institutional, professional, and industrial customers. The number of industrial dry cleaning plants has declined in recent years, as many facilities have shifted toward laundering with new detergent formulations;

Coin-operated dry cleaning services generally are operated as part of laundromat operations and are operated solely by the customers. They provide low-cost dry cleaning without the other services offered by commercial operations (pressing, spotting). Typical equipment has a capacity of 8 to 12 pounds.

The cleaning process involves the use of an organic-based solvent, detergents, and stain and spot removers to get rid of dirt, grease, and other soils from fabric items. There are three major dry cleaning systems, that are based on the type of solvent used:

Perchloroethylene, or perc, is the major solvent used in the industry, accounting for about 90 percent of all dry cleaning in the United States. Perc is nonflammable and provides high quality results at a relatively low cost. Unfortunately, this chlorinated solvent, also known as tetrachloroethylene, is toxic and designated as a hazardous air pollutant under Section 112 of the Clean Air Act;

Valclene is a chlorinated fluorocarbon (CFC-113), also known as freon 113 or trichlorotrifluoroethane. Like perc, it is also not flammable, but not as effective in cleaning and more expensive. It is also toxic and persistent. Other solvents used are trichloroethylene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, also known as methyl chloroform, and carbon tetrachloride. These halogenated solvents used to a limited degree in dry cleaning are subject to a production phaseout schedule under the Clean Air Act, as amended.

Petroleum based solvents, like Stoddard solvent, are petroleum distillates, typically composed of mixtures of paraffins and aromatic hydrocarbons. They have cleaning ability similar to CFC-113, but lower than perc. Petroleum solvents have flash points between 100°F and 140°F and are considered flammable or combustible. As a result, petroleum solvents require explosion-proof equipment.

There are three PRINCIPAL STEPS in dry cleaning operations: cleaning or washing, extracting, and drying.

  1. In the cleaning step, the solvent is introduced into the drum, or cylinder, with the clothes and small amounts of detergent and water. The drum is rotated to ensure thorough cleaning. At the end of the cycle, the liquid solvent is drained.
  2. Extraction of solvent from the wet clothes is achieved by spinning them at high speeds to force the solvent out.
  3. During the drying step, the clothes are tumbled in a stream of recirculating warm air to remove any remaining solvent. In vented machines, a final aeration step circulates fresh air through the clothes to remove residual solvent and to cool the garments.

Operation for dry cleaning facilities requires continuous reuse of the cleaning solvent. Therefore, AUXILIARY STEPS are incorporated in their operations for the purification of contaminated solvent, such as filtration and distillation steps.

  • Continuous filtration is employed to remove dirt and other contaminants from solvent during the cleaning cycle. Different types of filters are used in dry cleaning. These include cartridge filters, powder filters, and disc filtration systems; for additional protection, polishing filters can be installed downstream of the main filter.
  • Distillation of the cleaning solvent, continuous or periodic, is conducted after filtration. The solvent/water mixture is heated to a boiling point of the solvent (250°F for perc), that volatilizes the solvent, but leaves the impurities behind. The solvent vapors then are condensed and reclaimed, while the residues or still bottoms (dirt, oils, greases), along with a certain quantity of solvent, are collected for disposal as hazardous waste. For solvents that make azeotropic mixtures with water, this operation can be enhanced with the introduction of steam to still bottoms; it forms a solvent/water azeotrope mixture that boils at a lower temperature than solvent alone (190°F for perc/water mixture). As a result, the distillation rate increases and more solvent is recuperated from still bottoms, but this process creates additional wastewater.

Two basic types of machines are used for dry cleaning. These include:

  1. Transfer systems, where the washing-extraction and drying steps are conducted in separate machines. As a result, the clothes are manually transferred from the washer- extractor to a dryer or reclaimer. The petroleum based solvents are typically used in transfer machines.
  2. Dry-to-dry systems, where the drying cycle is conducted in the same machine as the cleaning and extraction cycles. Dry-to-dry machines can be further divided into:
a. Standard (vented) dry-to-dry machines, that are designed to vent residual solvent vapors to the atmosphere or vapor recovery equipment during the aeration cycle.
b. No-vent dry-to-dry machines do not include an aeration step. They are essentially closed systems, with built-in emission control equipment, and are open to the atmosphere only when the machine door is open for loading and unloading of clothes.

All dry cleaning facilities use hazardous materials. The Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) should be used for an accurate identification of hazardous materials. In addition, any petroleum product or any material or substance containing discarded petroleum products is hazardous material, according with Broward County Code of Ordinance Chapter 27 Sec.27-352.

The typical hazardous materials used in dry cleaning operations are provided below:

  • The solvent used for cleaning: perc, valclene and other chlorinated solvents, and petroleum based solvents.
  • All kind of spot removers.
  • Detergents and bleach.
  • Boiler treatment chemicals.
  • Oils/used oils(motor oil, hydraulic oil, etc.) and other petroleum products (gasoline, kerosene, diesel fuel, etc.).

The dry cleaning operations generate WASTES, non-hazardous and hazardous, in all physical states: liquid waste, solid waste, and air emissions. Therefore, the dry cleaning facilities have a potential multi-media contamination if these wastes are released to the environment.

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ATMOSPHERIC EMISSIONS AND HAZARDOUS WASTES GENERATED IN DRY CLEANING OPERATIONS

All solvents used in dry cleaning operations are hazardous materials. Two major pathways for solvent losses exist in dry cleaning operations: emissions to the atmosphere and losses in the generated wastes. In addition, solvent can be lost in the discharged wastewater.

Atmospheric emissions can occur at several locations in the dry cleaning operation and are estimated to account for 44 to 74 percent of total solvent losses. They can be process emissions or fugitive emissions.

  • Process emissions occur in transfer machines during the washing and aeration cycles and in vented dry-to-dry equipment during the aeration cycle. No-vent dry-to- dry machines are designed to eliminate process emissions (no aeration cycle). Other potential sources include those from stills and other auxiliary equipment and from the cleaning equipment during door openings.
  • Potential fugitive emission sources include evaporation during clothes handling in transfer operations, equipment leaks, open containers, losses during solvent transfer, and distillation wastes, and evaporation from spent filters, muck, and still bottoms storage for disposal.

Transfer systems typically produce higher solvent emissions, because of the need to handle the clothes after the extraction cycle. Fugitive emissions from dry-to-dry equipment can be as much as 50 percent less than from transfer units, because the need for handling the clothes is eliminated. Emission factors for dry cleaning machines are provided below (according with EPA data: Federal Register/Vol.57, No.191, 10-1-92 and Center for Emission Control - Dry Cleaning 09-92).

Emission Factors for Dry Cleaning Machines
(Pounds of perc per 100 pounds of clothes)

SOURCE OF
EMISSIONS
TRANSFER
UNITS
DRY-TO-DRY
(vented)
DRY-TO-DRY
(non-vented)
Machine vent

4.0

3.1

0

Clothing transfer

2.5

0

0

Equipment leaks

2.5

2.5

2.5

Losses in waste

3.2

3.2

3.2

TOTAL 12.2 8.8 5.7

A variety of hazardous wastes are generated by the dry cleaning industry, such as waste solvents, used filters and filter cartridges, still bottoms, muck, contaminated condensate water and absorbents, and solvent containers.

The typical wastes, their hazardous properties, and EPA waste code include:

  • Waste solvents are produced by equipment without recycling units. The most common waste solvents include:
Perchloroethylene: toxic, persistent, code F002;
Valclene: toxic, persistent, code F002;
Stoddard solvent: ignitable, code D001.
  • Used filters and filter cartridges are paper filters and carbon or diatomaceous earth which are contaminated with solvent.
  • Sludges (still bottoms) from the distillation and cooked powder residue (muck) from the filtration systems of used solvents contain dirt, oil, grease, detergent, and solvent.
  • Containers in which solvent is sold are considered hazardous waste unless they are being recycled, reused or are legally empty.
  • Condensate water contaminated with solvents and any absorbents used in cleaning floor and/or spills are hazardous materials or hazardous wastes.

The EPA waste code for all of the above would be either F002 or D001, depending on the solvent contamination.

NOTE: There is a big concern about wastewater (i.e. "Down the drain") contaminated with perc and its potential for groundwater contamination. South Florida is particularly sensitive in that all drinking water comes from the ground. Through complex chemical and biological processes, perc degradation has the following sequence of decay: Tetrachloroethylene Trichloroethylene Cis 1,2 Dichloroethylene/Trans 1,2 Dichloroethylene 1,1 Dichloroethylene Vinyl Chloride. Vinyl Chloride has a potential long-term carcinogenic effects in water, which could affect living organisms, including humans, through ingestion.

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P2-BMP OBJECTIVES, STRATEGIES, AND REQUIREMENTS

The P2-BMP for Dry Cleaners has been developed to achieve the following OBJECTIVES:

A. FACILITATE COMPLIANCE with all federal, state, and local environmental regulations governing the use, storage, generation, and disposal of hazardous materials and hazardous wastes, and air emissions within the dry cleaning industry.

B. ASSIST DISTRIBUTION OF THE FLORIDA SBAP Complete Multi-Media Environmental Compliance Assistance Guide for Dry Cleaning Industry to facilities located in BROWARD County.

C. ASSIST DRY CLEANERS in their mission to be good neighbors in implementation of pertinent pollution prevention techniques and waste minimization options.

D. PROVIDE INFORMATION on substitute solvents, alternative dry cleaning technologies, and research initiatives nation-wide.

The following STRATEGIES have been established:

1. DEVELOP P2-BMP FOR DRY CLEANERS OPERATING IN BROWARD COUNTY, a dual document which includes the local environmental requirements and Florida SBAP guide, in order to eliminate confusion for dry cleaning facilities in BROWARD County concerning the regulatory requirements.

2. ENSURE DISTRIBUTION OF P2-BMP TO EACH FACILITY. This document can be used by each dry cleaner as a self-audit manual, to ensure compliance and implementation of pollution prevention techniques.

3. ORGANIZE WORKSHOPS AND PROVIDE TRAINING to dry cleaner owners/operators. At these workshops the entire document will be reviewed and all the questions will be answered. A TRAINING CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION will be presented to the participants of workshops.

4. PROVIDE TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE thru confidential, non-regulatory on-site visits, upon request. The dry cleaner owner/operator should contact the pollution prevention section staff at 519-1257 or 519-1421 for this kind of technical assistance.

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BROWARD COUNTY ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATIONS THAT APPLY TO ALL DRY CLEANERS

Florida's Small Business Assistance Program (SBAP) has already published the Complete Multi- Media Environmental Compliance Assistance Guide for Dry Cleaning Industry. This guide was developed based on Federal and State of Florida requirements and also includes pollution prevention opportunities and a waste reduction program. The DNRP has considered it necessary to add to this document the local environmental requirements applicable to all dry cleaning facilities operating in Broward County. This dual document is intended to eliminate confusion for dry cleaning facilities in Broward County concerning the regulatory requirements.

The Broward County Code of Ordinances (BCCO) Chapter 27, known as "Broward County Natural Resource Protection Code", regulates the activities, facilities and items which pose a threat to the public health, safety and welfare of the citizens of Broward County and endanger the environment and natural resources. The Department of Natural Resource Protection (DNRP) is responsible for the protection, restoration and enhancement of Broward County's natural resources and environmental quality of life. This mission is accomplished through programs which are governed by the provisions of the BCCO Chapter 27 mentioned above.

In this part of P2-BMP document, we have attempted to summarize the local environmental code requirements applicable to dry cleaners. A self-audit checklist is provided to assist the facility owner/operator in evaluating the level of compliance with Broward County environmental regulations. If a non-compliant item is identified during the self-audit, instructions advising how to correct the discrepancy are provided directly below the question. This allows the owner/operator an opportunity to correct the problems, and to prevent potential fines or penalties by DNRP staff who may discover these same violations at a later date if not corrected. It is the responsibility of the owner/operator to understand what regulations affect their business, determine if the facility is in compliance and correct any discrepancies discovered.

In order to protect the air, waters, soils, and other natural resources, Broward County declares that the generation, use, storage, handling, processing, manufacturing, and disposal of hazardous material must be regulated. The unauthorized presence of hazardous material in the air, waters, soils, or other natural resources is prohibited and a responsible party shall take the necessary action to remediate and to remove such substances, in order to restore such natural resources to a condition which does not pose a threat to health, safety, or to the environment. The DNRP shall have the authority to license, evaluate, review, and administer all hazardous material activities, and all environmental assessment and remediation actions performed in Broward County (Sec. 27-351).

A hazardous material facility operating license shall be obtained by the owner/operator for any existing, new or proposed facility that generates, stores, processes, uses, handles, or manufactures hazardous material in quantities greater than specified in the definition of a hazardous material facility (Sec. 27-356(b)(1)a.). Application for license shall be submitted on DNRP forms and shall provide all information as requested therein (Sec. 27-356(b)(2)).

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SELF-AUDIT CHECKLIST

The owner/ operator is responsible for complying with all applicable requirements of the federal, state, and local government environmental laws and regulations.

The following issues and checklist address the local requirements provided in BCCO Chapter 27 "Broward County Natural Resource Protection Code". All dry cleaners within Broward County must comply with all applicable requirements.

A. ARTICLE XII. HAZARDOUS MATERIAL

YES / NO
Within a one month period of time do you have, generate, store, process, use or handle twenty-five (25) gallons or more of hazardous materials or is any extremely hazardous substance present in excess of the threshold planning quantity?
If NO, your facility is not regulated by the Article XII Hazardous Material. Proceed to Prohibitions.
If YES, your facility is governed by BCCO Chapter 27 Article XII Hazardous Material, no matter what solvent is used, and is subject to the following requirements:

YES / NO
Do you have a valid HAZARDOUS MATERIAL FACILITY LICENSE?
If NO, you must apply and obtain from DNRP a hazardous material facility license to operate a dry cleaning facility in Broward County. Application for license shall be submitted on DNRP forms. All information shall be provided as requested therein.

YES / NO
Do you fully comply with the general conditions printed on the back of Hazardous Material Facility License, which are applicable to all licenses issued by DNRP?
If NO, take necessary measures to ensure full compliance with each general condition.

YES / NO
Have you identified all the hazardous materials used, processed, stored or handled at your facility and all the hazardous wastes generated during your operation?
If NO, see typical hazardous materials used and hazardous wastes generated by dry cleaners. The Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) should be used for an accurate determination of hazardous materials.

YES / NO
Have you complied with all federal and state hazardous waste requirements?
Before answering, please review and complete the checklist of Hazardous Waste of SBAP Complete Multi-Media Environmental Compliance Assistance Guide. Take the necessary actions to correct all discrepancies.

General operating requirements (Sec.27-356(b)(4)a.)

Please answer all the questions that apply to your facility. If the question does not apply, check N/A.

YES / NO
Are individual storage containers labeled and maintained in accordance with all applicable federal and state standards?
If No, instruct employees on proper labeling. Please review the labeling requirements provided by SBAP Complete Multi- Media Environmental Compliance Assistance Guide section 4.3 Hazardous Waste.

YES / NO / N/A
Are sump pumps used to remove rainwater from hazardous material containment manually operated to prevent an automatic release of hazardous material to ground?
If NO, instruct employees to manually operate sump pumps at all times.

YES / NO / N/A
Are all monitoring wells installed, tested and maintained as required on the license?
If NO, install any monitoring wells required in accordance with the most current version of DNRP's "Minimum Criteria for Monitoring Wells and Sampling" and perform testing as specified in the license.

YES / NO
Have you developed procedures to ensure the appropriate and safe handling and cleanup of any release of hazardous material? DNRP may also require the owner/operator of a licensed hazardous material facility to prepare a spill contingency plan.
If NO, establish emergency response procedures to ensure for the safe handling and cleanup of any release of hazardous material. You should review and comply with the requirements that apply to you under the federal law 40 CFR 262.34(d)(4) and (5) and mentioned by SBAP Complete Multi-Media Environmental Compliance Assistance Guide section 4.3.3(c) Preparedness and Prevention.

Construction materials and methods (Sec.27-356(b)(4)b.)

YES / NO / N/A
Does storage tank configuration - with the exception of underground storage tanks provide for complete visual inspection?
If NO, ensure that all aboveground storage tanks provide for complete visual inspection.

YES / NO
Are all primary containments product-tight?
If NO, instruct employees to ensure compliance.

YES / NO
Do you provide secondary containment for all hazardous materials?
If NO, provide secondary containment, unless the hazardous material is contained solely in consumer products packaged for distribution and use by the general public or is a commercial product used for janitorial or minor maintenance purposes.

Note:Secondary containment is an impermeable coating, membrane, surface or structure in which tanks or containers are placed. A double-walled tank is considered secondary containment.

YES / NO / N/A
For tanks or containers larger than one hundred ten (110) gallons, does secondary containment hold one hundred ten (110) percent of the volume of the largest tank or container?
If NO, provide the appropriate secondary containment to ensure compliance with this requirement.

YES / NO
For tanks or containers of one hundred ten (110) gallons or less, does the secondary containment hold twenty (20) percent of the combined volume of all tanks or containers within the secondary containment, but no less than the volume of the largest tank or container?
If NO, provide appropriate secondary containment to ensure compliance with this requirement.

YES / NO
Are all secondary containment areas constructed of materials of sufficient thickness, density, and composition so as not be structurally weakened as a result of contact with the released hazardous materials?
If NO, take necessary actions to ensure compliance with this requirement.

YES / NO / N/A
Are all secondary containment areas provided with a roof to prevent rainwater from entering the area or, as an alternative, equipped with a lockable valve to enable the controlled release of any accumulation of clean rainwater?
If NO, provide each secondary containment with a roof or lockable valve.

YES / NO / N/A
Is all rainwater removed from the secondary containment area within twenty- four (24) hours of its accumulation?
If NO, instruct employees to do so.

YES / NO / N/A
Is any and all rainwater which comes into direct contact with any hazardous material collected and disposed of in accordance with requirements established for hazardous waste?
If NO, establish procedures and instruct employees on proper handling of contaminated rainwater.

YES / NO / N/A
Did you secure or permanently seal all floor drains in a hazardous material handling, usage or storage area which lead to a drain field, septic tank, or storm water system?
If NO, immediately secure or permanently seal these floor drains to prevent the release of hazardous material to a drain field, septic tank or storm water system.

YES / NO
Are all storage containers designed and constructed in accordance with the applicable standards established by the National Fire Protection Association, the American Society for Testing and Materials, the EPA or with alternate DNRP approved standards?
If NO, contact the agencies mentioned above for corrective actions.

Handling and storage (Sec.27-356 (b)(4)c.)

YES / NO
Are hazardous materials properly stored and handled on-site prior to disposal?
If NO, instruct employees to ensure for proper storage and handling on-site of hazardous materials.

YES / NO
Are hazardous materials accessible to inspection at any time?
If NO, ensure the accessibility to inspection of hazardous material at any time.

YES / NO / N/A
Did you remove all defective containers from service?
If NO, remove immediately from service defective containers. Instruct employees on repairing or decontamination and disposal of in accordance with federal, state and local regulations.

YES / NO
Do you avoid outdoor hazardous materials usage, including disassembly of any machinery, equipment or vehicles?
If NO, discontinue outdoor hazardous materials usage, unless drip pans, secondary containment, or other steps are taken to prevent any release.

YES / NO
Do you avoid outdoor storage of disassembled parts?
If NO, do not store disassembled parts outside, unless empty and in a manner which prevents contact with rainwater.

YES / NO
Are all drums containing hazardous material stored within a secondary containment area which is protected from weather or in a building and in accordance with all applicable fire codes?
If NO, instruct employees on proper storage of drums containing hazardous material.

YES / NO
Are reactive or incompatible materials stored in separate containers, in secondary containment areas, and in a manner which eliminates the potential for commingling in the event of a release?
If NO, ensure proper storage of reactive or incompatible materials. Please see also SBAP Complete Multi-Media Compliance Assistance Guide section 4.3.3(b) Incompatible Wastes.

YES / NO
Do you perform all hazardous material transfer, dispensing, or mixing activities in a manner which prevents any unauthorized release to the environment?
If NO, develop procedures to ensure prevention of any unauthorized release of hazardous material to the environment.

YES / NO
Do you comply with federal and state regulations regarding industrial wastewater disposal?
Before answering, please review and complete the checklist of section 4.6 Wastewater on page 54-57 of SBAP Complete Multi-Media Environmental Compliance Assistance Guide. Take the necessary actions to correct all discrepancies.

YES / NO
Do you have Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTW) permission or approval to release hazardous materials into a sanitary sewer system?
If NO, contact your POTW and obtain the permission or approval for your industrial wastewater (boiler/chiller/cooler blowdown, solvent-water mixture from water separator, condensate from carbon desorption and steam presses, etc.) discharge into sanitary sewer.

YES / NO
Do you keep hazardous waste on-site for a period of time longer than allowed in accordance with federal and state regulations, such as 180 day accumulation and storage time limit if you are a Small Quantity Generator or 90 day accumulation and storage time limit if you are a Large Quantity Generator of hazardous waste?
If YES, you may be required to obtain an extension from Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP).

YES / NO
Do you use DNRP licensed waste haulers for transporting all discarded hazardous materials, including used oils, to be disposed in accordance with federal, state and local regulations?
If NO, contact immediately the DNRP licensed waste haulers. Please review SBAP Complete Multi-Media Environmental Compliance Assistance Guide section 4.3.3.(e) through 4.3.8 to ensure compliance with federal and state regulations.

Record keeping and reports

YES / NO
Do you keep on-site for five (5) years all reports and records, including hazardous waste manifests, bills of landing, or other equivalent manifesting for all hazardous material disposal and are they available upon request for inspection by DNRP?
If NO, establish procedures to maintain a copy of reports and records for five years. Please note that this local requirement is more stringent than the federal and state provisions which require these records to be kept for three (3) years only. Please review SBAP Complete Multi-Media Environmental Compliance Assistance Guide section 4.3.3.(d).

YES / NO
Are Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) maintained on-site for each listed toxic substance?
If NO, ask your suppliers to send to you the up-dated MSDS for all chemicals used or stored at your facility and develop and maintain a file with these MSDS. Please review SBAP Complete Multi-Media Environmental Compliance Guide section 4.12.1 Florida Right-to-Know Law .

B. OTHER DNRP LICENSES THAT MAY APPLY TO DRY CLEANING FACILITIES

The owner/operator must apply to DNRP and obtain all applicable environmental licenses required by Broward County Natural Resource Code. The following check list addresses some DNRP licenses that may apply to dry cleaning facilities.

YES / NO
Do you have installed on your facility or do you intend to install aboveground storage tanks which have individual storage tank capacities of greater than five hundred fifty (550) gallons and/or underground storage tanks which have individual storage tank capacities of greater than one hundred ten (110) gallons?
If NO, no action is necessary.
If YES, provide all information requested on Application form section 11-13.
A combined Hazardous Material and Storage Tank Facility License will be issued by DNRP.

YES / NO
Is your facility located within wellfield zone 1 or 2? Maps illustrating wellfield zones in Broward County may be reviewed at the DNRP office.
If NO, no action is necessary.
If YES, provide all information requested on Hazardous Material Facility License Application forms and a license will be issued by DNRP. This license replaces the Hazardous Material Facility License which is issued for facilities located in wellfield zone 3 or outside of zones of influence.

YES / NO
Have you experienced a spill or other discharge of hazardous material exceeding the reportable quantity threshold or have you discovered the presence of any contaminant in the air, water or soil at a level which exceeds any applicable federal, state or local regulatory cleanup standards?
If NO, no action is necessary.
If YES, take the necessary measures to stabilize the situation, immediately report such incidents by phone to DNRP at (954) 519-1499 and provide written notification to DNRP within seven (7) calendar days. Written notification should be addressed to Division Director, Pollution Prevention and Remediation Programs Division. A determination of whether your facility will need an Environmental Assessment and Remediation License will be made by DNRP following review of all pertinent information in accordance with BCCO Sec.27-356 (e). Please also review SBAP Complete Multi-Media Environmental Compliance Assistance Guide section 4.12.2 State Dry-cleaning Solvent Cleanup Registration .

C. CLOSURE REQUIREMENTS
(Sec.27-356(b)(4)e. & 27-317(a)(4)

YES / NO
Do you intend to cease operations, initiate a temporary shutdown, transfer your license, permanently remove from use or close an underground or above ground storage tank which has a capacity of greater than one hundred ten (110) or five hundred fifty (550) gallons respectively?
If NO, no action is required.
If YES, notify in writing DNRP at least thirty (30) days prior to initiating one of these activities. Failure to notify DNRP may subject owner/operator to enforcement action. Conduct appropriate activities to ensure for the proper removal and disposal of all hazardous material at the facility.

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PROHIBITIONS

The following summary of GENERAL PROHIBITIONS may apply to dry cleaning facilities (Sec.27-353):

  • The abandonment or unauthorized release of hazardous material is prohibited.
  • No construction or other intrusive activities shall be initiated, proceed or continue without DNRP approval at any site where contaminants are known or discovered.
  • Flammable liquids shall be stored in full accordance with the most current version of the National Fire Protection Association Code (NFPA).
  • Storage, handling, usage or production of any hazardous material is prohibited within wellfield zone, unless licensed by DNRP.
  • No hazardous waste disposal sites are licensed or permitted in Broward County.

No person shall cause, permit, suffer, or allow the usage, storage, abandonment or disposal of hazardous material:

A. In a manner which violates a provision of any federal, state, or local regulation; or

B. In a manner which causes, or may cause, an unauthorized release of hazardous material.

  • No remedial actions, with the exception of initial remedial actions, shall be initiated at a contaminated site until a remedial action plan (RAP) has been approved by DNRP or Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP).
  • Pumping of water as a remedial action or dewatering operations at or within a one-quarter- mile radius of a contaminated site shall not be conducted without DNRP approval.

The following PROHIBITIONS may apply to dry cleaning facilities (BCCO Chapter 27 Art. V. WATER RESOURCE MANAGEMENT Sec. 27-193 & Sec.27-194):

  • No water management works within Broward County shall be excavated, created, constructed, altered or abandoned unless a surface water management license has been obtained.
  • After March 12, 1984, no new industrial wastewater discharge is permitted, suffered or allowed except as provided for under a county license. Industrial wastewater discharges existing on March 12, 1984, and in use since that time shall not be increased in quantity or decreased in quality, unless approved by the director upon demonstration that the activity does not pose a significant threat to the public health or environment.
  • Use of Storm Sewers and Sanitary Sewers: No domestic wastewater, industrial wastewater, or other wastewater shall be discharged into any sewer designated to carry storm water, nor shall storm water be discharged into a sewer designated to carry domestic wastewater. No industrial wastewater shall be discharged to sewers without prior approval of the county, the owner of the sewer system, and the owner of any wastewater treatment plant that is fed by the sewer system.

NOTE: If you have a storm water management system at your facility, you are required to consult with FDEP and Broward County Water Resource Division (BCWRD) and/or your local Water Management District for permitting, operating and maintenance requirements.

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